096. Learning to Grow & Be Capable with Emi Kirschner

By on April 7, 2020

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The Do a Day Podcast from Bryan Falchuk

Investor, serial entrepreneur, coach and international speaker, Emi Kirschner, masterfully combines her intuitive abilities with her analytical sense to help driven entrepreneurs become the Visionary CEO of their business resulting in doubling revenue.

Emi is an expert in:

  • Implementing strategic, long term plans
  • Increasing productivity and performance while reducing stress
  • Increasing sales by maximizing process and lead capture
  • Building and developing value centered, mission driven teams

She is also the host of the Tribe of Leaders podcast, where she interviews successful entrepreneurs who share how they have developed their leadership skills through the success and challenges of growing their business

As a Young Entrepreneur Academy instructor Emi teaches 7th-12th graders how to write a business plan and pitch to investors.

When not traveling, Emi can be found wearing flip flops and drinking coffee at many of the local shops where she lives in Philadelphia.

Key Points from the Episode with Emi Kirschner:
  • Emi is a business coach working with creative entrepreneurs looking to make a difference in other people’s lives.
  • She’s found many people who are more visionary and artistic or creative, yet may lack the structure skills to create the systems needed for those ideas to turn into successful businesses. She’s one of those people.
  • In helping people, she found that many don’t look at themselves as leaders, so she’s trying to spread the idea that everyone is a leader whether we see ourselves that way or not. She seeks to bring that message out with her Tribe of Leaders podcast.
  • Emi’s backstory includes stints in many different industries that taught her so much about business and the skills needed to succeed in it.
  • As a child, she grew up with a lot of moves for various reasons, whether job opportunities for her father, trying to get access to better schools or something else.
  • That included going from high school in urban Washington DC to rural New Hampshire.
  • Throughout that process, Emi and her sister were never really given a voice or choice in it, which informed how she’s chosen to parent her sons.
  • When she did voice her desire to stay through and finish a year of high school that was nearly done, although she spoke up, there was no consideration for what she said.
  • Today, she’s able to look at this situation with forgiveness and understanding that her parents did the best they could with what they knew, and Emi can do differently today with her kids.
  • Her kids always have the ability to speak their mind and explore what would work for them. This has also set them up for how they interact with adults more broadly, which is serving them well in their lives.
  • She remembers holding her oldest son when he was just a newborn, and knowing he (and then his younger brother) were going to be the most important things in her life.
  • She’s had to transition that mentality as her kids are becoming adults.
  • She also went through a divorce as she realized she and her husband didn’t work well together anymore.
  • She found herself sick regularly, and hasn’t since leaving her marriage.
  • As she’s up-leveled and changed, it raised the expectations for her kids to see what ‘doing better’ looks like.
  • She stopped tolerating things that weren’t serving her, and her kids and clients saw that.
  • She’s found that, when we stop worrying about blockers is when things tend to fall into place.
  • We are all experiencing this feeling of not being enough, not having enough value.
  • Her biggest wake up call came from her divorce, when she had been sick all the time with sinus infections and wishing to just feel good.
  • The inquiry into how to feel good led to more of a sense of needing to play.
  • The joy from a bit of silliness can create great growth and freedom to move forward.
  • It also opens you up to self-love, and seeing your abilities and strengths.
  • Whereas she used to see herself as making the best decisions for her kids, it changed to being a guide for her kids to make their own decisions.
  • She actually asks her kids to rate her on a scale of 1-10, and tell her what could be better.
  • She believes, as I do, that how we show up in one area of our lives impacts how we show up in others. We aren’t segregated pockets of who we are.
  • Emi loves list making, and prefers it to doing the 5 or 10 year plans, which end up being too vague, which makes it hard to make the right decisions of how to move forward.
  • Emi has created a sense of flow for her life through facing all the things she’s had to as a single mom of two very different kids.
  • Emi would ask her catering clients when she ran that business about the experience they wanted to have rather than just what they wanted to serve.
  • When her son Brian was a baby, he had a lot of digestive issues that doctors couldn’t help with, which set Emi on a journey to understand how food ties to our health, and build a passion for healthy cooking and eating.
  • She does believe in enjoying things you’re trying to enjoy without beating ourselves up.
  • We shouldn’t create stress around something that we’re trying to be happy about.
  • We will get lots of things wrong in life. It’s not for us to beat ourselves up, but rather to learn and more on.
  • Grow and be capable once you know.
  • No matter how much we have our stuff together, there’s always room to grow and learn if we live in a non-judgmental, open way.
  • Her approach with her kids is to allow, be heard and acknowledge them.

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